Book Review: President Darcy by Victoria Kincaid

Posted December 9, 2017 by soaringu in contemporary, four star, political romance, Reviews / 0 Comments

Book Review: President Darcy by Victoria KincaidPresident Darcy: A Modern Pride and Prejudice Variation by Victoria Kincaid
Published by Self on January 1st 1970
Genres: Contemporary, Romance
Pages: 278
Format: Kindle
Source: Purchased
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

A contemporary adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice

Billionaire President William Darcy has it all: wealth, intelligence, and the most powerful job in the country. Despite what his friends say, he is not lonely in the White House. He’s not. And he has vowed not to date while he’s in office. Nor is he interested in Elizabeth Bennet. She might be pretty and funny and smart, but her family is nouveau riche and unbearable. Unfortunately, he encounters her everywhere in Washington, D.C.—making her harder and harder to ignore. Why can’t he get her out of his mind?

Elizabeth Bennet enjoys her job with the Red Cross and loves her family, despite their tendency to embarrass her. At a White House state dinner, they cause her to make an unfavorable impression on the president, who labels her unattractive and uninteresting. Those words are immediately broadcast on Twitter, so the whole world now knows the president insulted her. Elizabeth just wants to avoid the man—who, let’s admit it, is proud and difficult. For some reason he acts all friendly when they keep running into each other, but she knows he’s judging her.

Eventually, circumstances force Darcy and Elizabeth to confront their true feelings for each other, with explosive results. But even if they can find common ground, Mr. Darcy is still the president—with limited privacy and unlimited responsibilities—and his enemies won’t hesitate to use his feelings for Elizabeth against him.

Can President Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet find their way to happily ever after?

Book Review: President Darcy by Victoria KincaidPresident Darcy: A Modern Pride and Prejudice Variation by Victoria Kincaid
Published by Self on January 1st 1970
Genres: Contemporary, Romance
Pages: 278
Format: Kindle
Source: Purchased
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

A contemporary adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice

Billionaire President William Darcy has it all: wealth, intelligence, and the most powerful job in the country. Despite what his friends say, he is not lonely in the White House. He’s not. And he has vowed not to date while he’s in office. Nor is he interested in Elizabeth Bennet. She might be pretty and funny and smart, but her family is nouveau riche and unbearable. Unfortunately, he encounters her everywhere in Washington, D.C.—making her harder and harder to ignore. Why can’t he get her out of his mind?

Elizabeth Bennet enjoys her job with the Red Cross and loves her family, despite their tendency to embarrass her. At a White House state dinner, they cause her to make an unfavorable impression on the president, who labels her unattractive and uninteresting. Those words are immediately broadcast on Twitter, so the whole world now knows the president insulted her. Elizabeth just wants to avoid the man—who, let’s admit it, is proud and difficult. For some reason he acts all friendly when they keep running into each other, but she knows he’s judging her.

Eventually, circumstances force Darcy and Elizabeth to confront their true feelings for each other, with explosive results. But even if they can find common ground, Mr. Darcy is still the president—with limited privacy and unlimited responsibilities—and his enemies won’t hesitate to use his feelings for Elizabeth against him.

Can President Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet find their way to happily ever after?

Victoria Kincaid really did make me addicted to the entire Pride and Prejudice trope. I can now see why it is so addicted. Now, I’m motivated to read the actual book by Jane Austen.

President Darcy is the modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice. It features President William Darcy and Elizabeth Bennett, a Red-cross worker, who is from a nouveau-riche family. Like the retelling goes there is a lot of aminosity and hate the goes on between the two characters. However, it is really awesome to see them really see each other and overcome their differences.

President Darcy and Elizabeth are really both strong willed and real characters. I love that Kincaid’s modern spin on this trope made both of them relevant. Darcy is the President and is highly arrogant. He is a good person, but his flaws do get the best of him. I initially did not like him in the beginning, but I love his character growth. He is quiet struck by Elizabeth in the beginning. It was adorable to see a powerful man fumbling and blushing like a 15 year old boy at times. Also, as the book goes on you get to see his fun side. Man, I swooned. Elizabeth is one of my favorite heroines. She is struggling to be independent and establish her own indentity separate from her family. The fact that she is a humanitarian aid worker is really cool. I like that she is selfless and puts up with Darcy’s antics in the beginning. My only issue with Elizabeth is her pride issues. I felt that she was way too blind and it was frustrating at times. Also, her liency on some of the antagonists in this book drove me nuts.

Elizabeth’s and Darcy’s romance had an overall good flavor towards it. I love that it is a slow burn. No kissing or any of that stuff didn’t happen until halfway through. My only issue is that when they realize they are in love with each other, it happens too fast. I felt that initial hate to love realization happened way too fast. And, the following drama that happened really just felt unnecessary. I wish it had wrapped up a bit earlier. But, still I love the slow burn feeling. In addition, it is a clean romance. I like that nothing was too detailed or over the top steamy.

The side characters in this book added a very nice flare to the book. I love Elizabeth’s family. I liked her sisters, but Lydia was like the ugh one. I wanted to slap her immaturity at times. But I could understand where she came from. Kincaid also did a great job researching into the corruption and rivalry of politics. The facts about the White House was correct.

Overall, I really did enjoy reading this book. My only issue is that the ending was a bit flat coupled with unnecessary drama. Because of this I am giving it four stars.

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